Monthly Archives: April 2011

Soccer Scores a Sister City

Pictured here is OWU Professor Jay Martin presenting the Proclamation from Delaware to Baumholder, Germany’s Mayor, Peter Lang, and Vice Mayor, Bernd Mai. (Photo courtesy of Jay Martin)

For 33 years, the Ohio Wesleyan men’s soccer team has shared a relationship of friendship and fussball with the city of Baumholder, Germany. Every three years, the Bishops, led by coach Jay Martin, make the trip overseas to visit the citizens who have become their friends and play a little soccer.

Coming Full Circle

Sue Pasters. (Photo courtesy of OWU’s Office of University Chaplain)

Editor’s Note: To honor Sue Pasters as she retires from OWU and her responsibilities as Director of Community Service Learning, the Connect2 OWU staff is re-posting the following story which highlights Pasters’ many contributions to that office, Ohio Wesleyan, and the Delaware community.

Ohio Wesleyan Faculty Receive Grant to Create Enhanced, Historical Maps of Columbus

Ohio Wesleyan faculty members David Walker and John Krygier discuss their new project, which will create the first-ever digital versions of historic maps of Columbus neighborhoods. (Photo by Linda O’Horo)

Ohio Wesleyan University professors John Krygier, Ph.D., and David Walker, Ph.D., will lead a collaborative project funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Five Colleges of Ohio Next Steps in the Next Generation Library: Integrating Digital Collections into the Liberal Arts Curriculum to create digital versions of rare, historic real estate atlas maps of Columbus neighborhoods. Their grant was written for The Five Colleges of Ohio, which includes OWU, Denison University, Kenyon College, The College of Wooster, and Oberlin College. This is a curricular collaboration project between faculty and the Ohio Wesleyan Library.

Exploring the Land of Democracy’s Birth

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“Who wishes to address the Assembly?” Thus spoke the Herald, living in the days of ancient Athens, at periodic gatherings of male citizens who came to listen, discuss, debate, or vote on issues and decrees affecting all areas of Athenian life, public and private.