Ohio Wesleyan to Host 2014 Economic Outlook Conference

Experts to Discuss Regional, National, International Economies at Free Nov. 11 Event

DELAWARE, Ohio – Will the economy sink, swim, or merely tread water in 2014? Three economics experts will float predictions for the regional, national, and global economies at Ohio Wesleyan University’s 2014 Economic Outlook Conference.

This year’s conference will be held at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11 in the Benes Rooms of Ohio Wesleyan’s Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware. The event, which is free and open to the public, also will be streamed live online at stream.owu.edu. The panel will feature Edward S. Knotek II, Ph.D., of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; Jim Newton, Ph.D., of Economic Perspectives Inc.; and Ian Sheldon, Ph.D., of The Ohio State University.

The 2014 Economic Outlook Conference is co-sponsored by Ohio Wesleyan’s Department of Economics and by the university’s Woltemade Center for Economics, Business and Entrepreneurship. During the conference, each expert will speak for 15 minutes and then respond to questions and comments from the audience and from panel moderator, Goran Skosples, Ph.D., Ohio Wesleyan associate professor of economics.

About the panelists and moderator:

Edward S. Knotek II

Edward S. Knotek II

Edward S. Knotek II is a vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, where he leads the development of the bank’s forecasting models. His research focuses on macroeconomics and monetary economics. In addition to forecasting, he has conducted research on firms’ price-setting behavior, inflation dynamics, unemployment movements over the business cycle, consumers’ responses to uncertainty, and consumer debt dynamics. He earned his doctorate in economics from the University of Michigan.

Jim Newton

Jim Newton

Jim Newton is the president and owner of central, Ohio-based Economic Perspectives Inc. He previously served as chief economic adviser for Commerce National Bank in Columbus and has taught economics courses at both Ohio State and DeVry University. Newton earned his doctorate in adult education in economics from Ohio State.

Ian Sheldon

Ian Sheldon

Ian Sheldon is the Andersons Professor of International Trade and graduate studies leader for the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State. His primary research interests involve analyzing international trade and policy. Sheldon recently completed a term as chair of the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium. He earned his doctorate in economics from the University of Salford, United Kingdom.

Goran Skosples

Goran Skosples

Goran Skosples joined the Ohio Wesleyan faculty in 2006. He encourages students to relate each lesson to current events to help them understand the underlying importance of government economic policies in their daily lives. His research deals with institutional changes in post-communist countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, banking and credit, and small-business finance. He earned his doctorate from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Learn more about Ohio Wesleyan’s Department of Economics at economics.owu.edu and more about the Woltemade Center for Economics, Business and Entrepreneurship at wcebe.owu.edu.


Founded in 1842, Ohio Wesleyan University is one of the nation’s premier small, private universities. Ohio Wesleyan offers more than 90 undergraduate majors, sequences, and courses of study, and 23 NCAA Division III varsity sports. OWU combines an internationally focused curriculum with off-campus learning and leadership opportunities that connect classroom theory with real-world practice. Located in Delaware, Ohio, OWU’s 1,850 students represent 41 states and 45 countries. The university is featured in the book “Colleges That Change Lives,” listed on the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction, and included on the “best colleges” lists of U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review. Learn more at www.owu.edu.

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